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Chapter:Blender Recipes: Fruit and Raw Vegetables
Section:Smoothies: Juice Added
Recipe:Breakfast Smoothie/Dessert
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Breakfast Smoothie/Dessert
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I start by making a few days worth of juice. I usually do this in the
evenings. I do not really believe that a lot of pure juice is very
compatible with a paleo diet since I do not see how H/Gs would have had the
juice without the fruit. Therefore, I buy whole frozen berries and
sometimes frozen pineapple or mango and fill my blender with it. Berries
are relatively low in carbs for those of you watching your carb intake.

Next, you add enough apple juice to cover the fruit. I use flash
pasteurized apple juice from Trader Joes. Ideally you would make your own
with a juicer but be sure to at least get unfiltered.

Blend until smooth. I have a KitchenAid blender which is pretty good. Some
cheaper blenders will not be up to the task.

At this point you can just enjoy the juice as is. In fact, if you add less
juice, you can make a pretty thick frozen desert.

For breakfast, however, I like to get a bit more protein. I got a
Hamilton-Beach DrinkMaster about 10 years ago for making ice cream shakes.
Having quit sugar, it has gotten no use for years. Well, I discovered that
if I put one egg in the cup and add about 8-10 ounces of juice and blend
for about 30-seconds, I get a very light, tasty smoothie. My breakfast
takes me about 2 minutes to prepare and, if I am in a hurry, I can drink it
in the car on my way to work. Sometimes I use 12 ounces of juice and 2
eggs.

The only real worry is the possibility of getting salmonella from the raw
eggs. The consensus on this list appears to be that, while it is possible
for the salmonella to be inside the eggs, it is more likely to just be on
the shell. So it is probably a good idea to dip your eggs in boiling water
for a couple of seconds when you get them home. This is also a great way to
make them last longer. In fact, in my backpacking days, I learned that you
can keep eggs unrefrigerated for days after sealing the egg with this
little trick.

From: Scott Maxwell (Scott at MAXWELL.NET)
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